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A Book Apart

Why you should write a book (yes, you)

May 11, 2020

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So you’re thinking about writing a book. Heck yeah. We’ll be honest: writing a book can feel daunting and difficult. But it can also bring you joy, expand your depth of knowledge—and inspire others!

Erika Hall and her book cake

If you’re excited (and a little terrified) to get started, that sounds exactly right. If you’re not sure what to do next or what to expect, or whether you even feel ready, take a deep breath. We’ve been there—from idea spark to launch party, and we want to share a few words of encouragement. Because we want to hear your voice.

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WHY YOU SHOULD WRITE A BOOK (YES, YOU)

Jeremy Keith said it best: “You should definitely do it—the more (and varied) voices we have, the better.” We wholeheartedly agree and we know it doesn’t always seem like all voices are welcome in this industry. We want to change that, and we hope some of these words of encouragement help.

“You can do it! You don't need to be an industry big shot to write a book; you just need the drive and willingness to work at it. Being committed to the work of writing and editing is so much more important than credentials or name recognition—and we love working with new voices!”
—Lisa Maria Marquis

“Anyone can do it! I left school when I was sixteen, and I always felt undereducated and unqualified. It turns out that it didn’t matter. You need to know your subject, and be willing to put in the work. Everything else you can figure out as you go along.”
—Rachel Andrew

“There are books on almost every topic, but there's not YOUR book on that topic. Figure out what perspective you bring, write in a voice that feels natural, and bring as much of yourself to the page as possible.”
—Sara Wachter-Boettcher

“Anyone can write a book! The only difference between an author and a non-author is that the author decided to write a book and followed through with it. :)”
—Dan Cederholm

“Even though you may not realize it, you have important perspective and wisdom to share with the world! You don’t need to be THE expert to write a book.”
—Leslie Zaikis, marketing lead

IT FEELS CHALLENGING, NO MATTER WHO YOU ARE

Ever wondered whether your favorite author has struggled with writing? They have—and it’s such a relief to hear them talk about it!

“Even the most thoughtful, disciplined people can struggle when writing a book.”
—Jason Santa Maria

“I didn’t realize how hard it would be. It’s really relentless, because there’s always something to improve.”
—Aarron Walter

“Writing can feel awfully hard, because you’re putting so much emotion in it!”
—Brittany Clark, marketing lead

“Writing’s rough for me even in the best of times, and writing a book is even harder. What if you take a thing that’s difficult and…make it last longer?? That is: BOOKS.”
—Ethan Marcotte

“Everyone I know who has written a book is very happy to have done it...once they got through that whole unavoidable writing part.”
—Jeremy Keith

DON’T GO IT ALONE

Throughout most writing projects, you’ll have to get comfortable with long stretches of solitary work. That’s why we think it’s so essential to ask for help—from editors, reviewers, friends, and colleagues. Rallying your support crew together makes a good book great.

“It’s not a sole pursuit. The amount of support you get—and need!—from editors, friends, publishers, family, and more is both necessary and lovely.”
—Dan Mall

“Ask for help early and often. Even if you can see the book clearly from beginning to end, you might still get lost along the way, and the more people you involve the better your book will be for it.”
—Scott Kubie

“The best writing happens with other people. I thought that drafting my manuscript (a solitary process, a tight little anxiety spiral between me and my screen) was “writing the book,” but the real work started with editing. Collaborating with an editorial team makes all the difference.”
—Lisa Maria Marquis

“There is always someone who goes above and beyond to make the process delightful, like a colleague who reads your draft and gives you encouragement on exactly the day you were thinking about quitting, or a friend from high school who buys fifty copies of the book for their class. (Often there are many someones!)”
—Leslie Zaikis, marketing lead

MAKE TIME TO CELEBRATE

Writing a book is an enormous endeavor, so don’t let launch day slip by. Whether you celebrate with a sweet treat or fancy festivities, take a moment to acknowledge and appreciate your hard work!

“It will take three times longer than you anticipate! But it’s worth all the effort! I had a book signing, and so many dear and wonderful friends and faces came—it felt magical to drink champagne and share that moment with them all!”
—Rachel Nabors

There is something amazing about crossing the finish line of a book. It's a real career-defining moment that you'll think of positively, and others will strongly associate with you.”
—Chris Coyier

“My favorite parts were the early, quiet mornings I spent writing the first draft, the relief of getting great feedback from my editors, and the excitement of launch day. It also still feels incredible to hold my own book in my hands.”
—Tim Brown

We’ll leave with two words to describe our favorite way to celebrate: BOOK CAKE!

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➜ Read the previous post on writing real talk
➜ Read more posts in this series